Massachusetts legal challenge eviction moratorium

SJC Punts On Challenge to Eviction Moratorium Act

by Rich Vetstein on June 25, 2020

Mass. Supreme Judicial Court Justices

SJC Sends Case Down to Suffolk Superior Court; Rental Property Owners Gear Up For Federal Court Fight

As many of you know, I am lead counsel in the legal challenge to overturn the COVID-19 Eviction Moratorium Act, which was filed with the Supreme Judicial Court at the end of May. The case is Matorin v. Chief Justice of the Housing Court, SJC-2020-0442. The Attorney General’s Office agreed with us that the SJC should take up the case. However, yesterday, Justice David Lowy ordered the case sent down to the Suffolk Superior Court for consideration of all the issues raised by the petition. Suffice to say, we are very disappointed that the SJC has declined to take up the constitutionality of the Eviction Moratorium, which is causing widespread financial and personal harm to rental housing providers across the state. Perhaps the Act is simply too much of a political “hot potato” for the SJC to weigh in during this global pandemic. Justice Lowy provided no reasoning or rationale for taking such action. See Order below.

Nevertheless, the case will still proceed in Suffolk Superior Court and we have lost nothing except for some time. The merits of our claims have not yet been addressed and will be considered by the Superior Court in due course. We will do everything we can to fast-track the case. The case has been specially assigned to the very well respected Justice Paul D. Wilson, appointed by Gov. Patrick and formerly a partner at Mintz, Levin.

Despite this, we are not going down without a fight. We have decided to file our federal constitutional claims in Federal Court in Boston, seeking to strike down the Moratorium. We are hopeful that the federal court will give us a fair shot. I’ll keep you posted on that front as well. 

It seems like we are fighting everyone on these important issues for the rental property community. Meanwhile, state Cambridge Rep. Mike Connolly and Congresswoman Pressley just held a virtual town hall on Facebook, and said they are filing a bill to extend the Moratorium for 12 MONTHS. They are also filing a bill to FREEZE rents, as well as RENT CONTROL. Obviously, this would be devastating to rental housing providers. We could use some positive PR and stories about small landlords being really hurt by this Moratorium. 

This fight will go on — to the end. I’ll keep you posted. Also, with more litigation, comes more legal fees and expenses. We are still seeking donations to the cause. To contribute please click our secure Paypal link: https://paypal.me/pools/c/8orbLzpxbY.

Single Justice Order of Transfer Matorin v. Chief Justice by Richard Vetstein on Scribd

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Rental Property Owners File Emergency Petition with Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Asserting COVID-19 Eviction Moratorium Act Is Unconstitutional

Attorney Richard D. Vetstein and his colleague, Jordana Roubicek Greenman, Esq., have filed an Emergency Petition with the Supreme Judicial Court on behalf of two local rental property owners challenging the constitutionality of the recently passed, Act Providing For a Moratorium On Evictions and Foreclosures During the COVID-19 Emergency and the its regulations. A copy of the Petition can be viewed below.

One of the plaintiffs is a elderly woman on a fixed income whose tenant owes her over $6,000 in back rent and told her “The Governor says I don’t have to pay my rent anymore.” She risks bankruptcy and foreclosure if something isn’t done. The other plaintiff has a non-payment eviction in progress in Worcester Housing Court, and is owed several months of rent with no likelihood of any payment while the Act suspends his case.

As outlined in the Petition, the Eviction Moratorium Act imposes an unprecedented and indefinite shutdown of virtually every future and pending eviction case in the state, as well as prohibiting landlords from even issuing notices to quit.  The Petitioners, two local rental property owners saddled with non-paying tenants whom they cannot evict, claim irreparable harm on behalf of themselves and all other similarly situated rental property owners across the state.  The Petitioners assert the Act is an unconstitutional infringement on their constitutional right to access the courts and right to petition. They also claim the Act is an unconstitutional interference by the Legislature on the core functions of the courts.  Further, the Act operates as a “taking” without just compensation because it forces rental property owners to house non-paying tenants without any recourse.  Lastly, the Petitioners argue the Act violates the U.S. Constitution’s Contracts Clause as it unconstitutionally impairs their lease agreements.

 The operation of the Act obligates rental property owners to pay their own mortgages, real estate taxes, insurance, and water/sewer used by non-paying tenants, and to maintain their properties and comply with the state sanitary code, while being effectively deprived of the revenue required to do those things.  Given the unpredictable nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, this one-sided obligation and burden will continue indefinitely and quite possibly into 2021.  Many small rental property owners, especially those on fixed income, rely on rents to afford to live in their own homes.

The Supreme Judicial Court is expected to take up the case next week, and will hopefully schedule it for hearing. I will provide you with updates of course.

We are also still seeking donations to the cause. To contribute please click our secure Paypal link: https://paypal.me/pools/c/8orbLzpxbY.

Matorin v Chief Justice, SJ… by Richard Vetstein on Scribd

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