Boston MA mortgage rates

by Brian Cavanaugh, Senior Mortgage Banker, RMS Mortgage and SmarterBorrowing.com

Overall, despite being a fairly light week in terms of economic releases and relate events, it is still relatively crucial for the mortgage market. We saw the yield on the benchmark 10-year Treasury Note spike higher Friday as a result of the stronger than expected employment data. Stocks rallied as a result of that data, extending the 2012 stock rally that has pushed the Dow up over 5% and the Nasdaq up 11% year-to-date. Both indexes are at their highest levels since May 2008 and December 2000 respectively. This has me believing we are due to see a pullback in stocks fairly soon. If/when this happens, we should see funds shift back into bonds for safety, leading to lower mortgage rates. Keep in mind that this is more or less just speculation, but I am expecting to move to a less conservative approach regarding short-term mortgage rates in the near future.

If I were considering financing/refinancing a home, I would….

LOCK if my closing was taking place within 7 days…

LOCK if my closing was taking place between 8 and 20 days…

FLOAT if my closing was taking place between 21 and 60 days…

FLOAT if my closing was taking place over 60 days from now…

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed

There are only two pieces of monthly economic data scheduled for release this week. Neither of them is considered to be highly important, so we don’t have much to pin our hopes on or to be concerned with this week. There are two Treasury auctions on the calendar that may influence mortgage rates the middle part of the week and the second part of Fed Chairman Bernanke’s testimony to Congress, but no important economic data.

Nothing of concern is due tomorrow, so look for the stock markets and news from Europe- particularly Greece, to drive the markets tomorrow. Fed Chairman Bernanke will speak to the Senate Budget Committee at 10:00 AM Tuesday. I don’t expect him to say anything different than he said last week to the House Budget Committee, but the Q&A portion of his appearance could lead to something new. It is worth watching, but it will probably not lead to a noticeable change in the markets or mortgage rates.

Treasury Auctions Ahead

The two important Treasury auctions come Wednesday and Thursday when 10-year Notes and 30-year Bonds are sold. The 10-year sale is the more important one as it will give us a better indication of demand of mortgage-related securities. If the sales are met with a strong demand from investors, we should see the bond market move higher during afternoon trading the days of the auctions. But a lackluster interest from buyers, particularly international investors, would indicate a waning appetite for longer-term U.S. securities and lead to broader bond selling. The selling in bonds would likely result in upward afternoon revisions to mortgage rates.

Unemployment Numbers

With little monthly and no quarterly economic reports being posted, Thursday’s weekly release of unemployment figures may end up moving the markets and mortgage rates more than it traditionally does. The Labor Department is expected to announce that 370,000 new claims for unemployment benefits were filed last week, rising slightly from the previous week’s total. The higher the number of new claims for benefits, the better the news for the bond market and mortgage pricing as it would indicate weakness in the employment sector.

The first monthly report comes early Friday morning when December’s Goods and Services Trade Balance data will be posted. This report measures the U.S. trade deficit and can affect the value of the U.S. dollar versus other currencies, but it usually does not cause enough movement in bond prices to affect mortgage rates. It is expected to show a $48.2 billion trade deficit.

Consumer Sentiment

February’s preliminary reading to the University of Michigan’s Index of Consumer Sentiment will be released late Friday morning. This index measures consumer willingness to spend and usually has a moderate impact on the financial markets. If it shows an increase in consumer confidence, the stock markets may move higher and bond prices could fall. It is currently expected to come in at 74.0, down from January’s final reading of 75.0. That would indicate consumers were less optimistic about their own financial situations than last month and are less likely to make large purchases in the near future. Since consumer spending makes up over two-thirds of the U.S. economy, this would be considered good news for bonds and mortgage pricing.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Homebuyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected]  617.771.5021

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Massachusetts Weekly Mortgage Rate Report (Dec. 20, 2011)

by Rich Vetstein on December 20, 2011

A Guest Post by Brian Cavanaugh of SmarterBorrowing.com.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates or Guidelines   [email protected]  617.771.5021

Overall, I am expecting to see some movement in the markets and mortgage rates, especially if we get some surprising results from the week’s data or news about Europe’s financial crisis. Despite the holiday season, we need to keep a cautious approach toward rates because we are likely to see very thin trading (light volume) as a result of many traders keeping short hours or home for the holiday altogether. This means that firms that trade bonds will likely be keeping only a skeleton staff the latter part of the week and raises the possibility of a stronger reaction to surprises in the economic data than we normally would see.

The least important day for mortgage rates will likely be tomorrow unless something drastic happens overnight. We will probably see the most movement in rates Friday, but Thursday’s economic data can also move mortgage pricing noticeably. With the Christmas holiday next weekend, it is being observed next Monday. The bond market will close early this Friday afternoon ahead of the holiday and will reopen next Tuesday morning. Accordingly, proceed cautiously this week if still floating an interest rate and closing by the end of the year.  proceed cautiously this week if still floating an interest rate and closing by the end of the year.

If I were considering financing/refinancing a home, I would….

LOCK if my closing was taking place within 7 days…

LOCK if my closing was taking place between 8 and 20 days…

LOCK if my closing was taking place between 21 and 60 days…

FLOAT if my closing was taking place over 60 days from now…

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed.

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Brian Cavanaugh of SmarterBorrowing.com is back with his Massachusetts Weekly Mortgage Rate Update. Scroll to the bottom for Brian’s valuable Massachusetts Mortgage Rate Lock Advice!

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates or Guidelines   [email protected]  617.771.5021

Overall, I am expecting to see a much more active week in the financial markets and mortgage pricing than last week. The most important day of the week is either Tuesday or Friday due to the reports being posted those days and the FOMC meeting scheduled. Please maintain contact with your mortgage professional if you have not locked an interest rate yet because we may see sizable changes to mortgage pricing more than one day this week.

If I were considering financing/refinancing a home, I would….

LOCK if my closing was taking place within 7 days…

LOCK if my closing was taking place between 8 and 20 days…

LOCK if my closing was taking place between 21 and 60 days…

LOCK if my closing was taking place over 60 days from now…

Busy Week Ahead

This week is fairly busy in terms of the number of economic releases and other events scheduled that may influence mortgage rates. There are only four pieces of economic data for us to watch, but three of them are highly important to the markets. In addition to the economic reports, we also have the last FOMC meeting of the year and two important Treasury auctions that are likely to impact bond trading and mortgage pricing. Those events, coupled with the likelihood of further overseas developments from Europe and possibly others, make it highly likely that we will see plenty of movement in the markets and mortgage rates this week.

There is nothing of relevance scheduled for tomorrow. This means we can expect the stock markets to drive bond trading and mortgage rates again. If the major stock indexes open the week with gains tomorrow morning, bonds may move lower, pushing mortgage rates higher. But a weak open in stocks could lead to slightly lower mortgage rates tomorrow. We could also see traders position themselves ahead of the week’s agenda, so even though there is nothing concerning on the calendar, we could see mortgage rates change.

Consumer Price Index Out

The week’s most important economic data comes Friday morning when November’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) is posted. It is similar to Thursday’s Producer Price Index, except it tracks inflationary pressures at the more important consumer level of the economy. Current forecasts call for an increase of 0.1% in the overall index and a 0.1% rise in the core data reading. The core data is watched more closely because it excludes more volatile food and energy prices, giving a more stable reading for analysts to consider. This data is one of the most watched inflation indexes, which is extremely important to long-term securities such as mortgage related bonds. Rising inflation erodes the value of a bond’s future fixed interest payments, making them less appealing to investors. That translates into falling bond prices and rising mortgage rates.

Retail Sales Report

Tuesday has two important events, starting with November’s Retail Sales report. This 8:30 AM ET release will give us a key measurement of consumer spending by tracking sales at retail level establishments. This data is highly important to the markets because consumer spending makes up two-thirds of the U.S. economy. Rapidly rising consumer spending raises the possibility of seeing solid economic growth. Since long-term securities such as mortgage bonds are usually more appealing to investors during weaker economic conditions, a large increase in retail sales will likely drive bond prices lower and mortgage rates higher Tuesday. Current forecasts are calling for an increase of 0.6% in November’s sales.

Last Fed Meeting

The last FOMC meeting of the year will also be held Tuesday, adjourning at 2:15 PM ET. There is not much debate about what the Fed will do at this meeting with no chance of them raising key short-term interest rates. Therefore, the post meeting statement will likely be the sole source of a market reaction. This statement has the potential to have a significant influence on the markets and mortgage rates as investors look for any indication of what and when the Fed may do next. One potential move would be more debt purchases by the Fed. An announcement of another round of quantitative easing (QE3) could help boost bond prices and improve mortgage rates Tuesday afternoon. Besides that, it is believed that there isn’t much more the Fed can do to help boost economic activity.

Treasury Auctions

There are Treasury auctions scheduled for several days this week, but the two important ones are the 10-year Note sale Tuesday and the 30-year Bond sale Wednesday. Tuesday’s auction is the more important of the two and will likely influence mortgage rates more. Results of each sale will be posted at 1:00 PM ET. If they were met with a strong demand from investors, particularly international buyers, we should see afternoon strength in bonds and improvements to mortgage pricing those days. On the other hand, a weak interest in the auctions could lead to upward revisions to mortgage rates during afternoon hours.

Wednesday has little to be concerned with, except for the 30-year Bond auction. November’s Producer Price Index (PPI) will be posted early Thursday morning. It measures inflationary pressures at the producer level of the economy. There are two portions of the index that are used- the overall reading and the core data reading. The core data is the more important of the two because it excludes more volatile food and energy prices. If Thursday’s release reveals stronger than expected readings, indicating that inflationary pressures are rising, the bond market will probably react negatively and drive mortgage rates higher. If we see in-line or weaker than expected numbers, the bond market should respond well and mortgage rates should fall. Current forecasts are showing a 0.2% increase in the overall index and a 0.1% rise in the core data.

Nov. Industrial Production Report

November’s Industrial Production data is also scheduled to be posted Thursday morning, but a little later than the PPI. This report gives us a measurement of manufacturing sector strength by tracking output at U.S. factories, mines and utilities. Analysts are expecting it to show a 0.2% increase in output, indicating modest manufacturing growth. A smaller than expected rise would be good news for bonds, while a stronger reading may result in slightly higher mortgage pricing. However, the PPI release is more important to the markets than this data is.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Homebuyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected]  617.771.5021

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

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Get Out! A Landlord’s Guide to Massachusetts Evictions

by Rich Vetstein on October 7, 2011

Massachusetts Summary Process Evictions: An Unlevel Playing Field For Landlords

How do you evict a tenant in Massachusetts? In Massachusetts, evictions are called “summary process.” According to the rules governing eviction cases, summary process is supposed to be “just, speedy, and inexpensive.” In practice, however, summary process can be anything but that. In fact, as I always inform my landlord clients, Massachusetts is one of the most tenant friendly states in the country, and an eviction can be costly, frustrating and unfair to landlords. In some cases, it can take many months to evict a tenant.

Further, Massachusetts eviction practice is loaded with traps for the unwary and procedural complexities for landlords. Landlords who represent themselves do so at their own peril and will often arrive at court with their cases dismissed for not following these requirements. It’s not a do-it-yourself situation.

Grounds For Eviction

A.      Non-payment

There are several common grounds for evicting a tenant. The most common is for non-payment of rent. In these cases, the landlord must send the tenant a statutory 14 day “notice to quit” before starting the eviction process. The 14 day notice to quit must be drafted carefully, and the best practice is to have it served by a constable or sheriff to ensure proof of delivery. The landlord must prove in court that the tenant received the notice, and service by constable or sheriff will automatically qualify as “good service.” Certified mail is not good enough as tenants can avoid pickup. Having an experienced eviction attorney draft the notice to quit can prevent have your case being “dead on arrival.”

B.      No-Fault

Another common ground for eviction is for termination of a 30 day tenancy at will, otherwise known as a no-fault eviction. Again, a 30 day notice to quit must be served on the tenant before commencing an eviction. Landlords often trip up on this type of notice with short months. In practice, judges will often give tenants in no-fault evictions a bit more leeway in terms of vacating the premises.

C.      For cause

“For cause” evictions encompass the range of bad behavior by tenants in violation of lease provisions. It could be illegal activity, drug use, excessive noise, uncleanliness, harassment of other residents, non-approved “roommates” and the like. Like all other evictions, the landlord must issue a notice to quit to the tenant stating the specifics of the offenses. “For cause” evictions are the most involved of all evictions as the landlord must offer proof by way of live testimony of the tenant’s violations of the lease. Getting police officers to show up for an eviction hearing can be challenging. For drugs and other illegal activity, Massachusetts also has a special expedited eviction process.

Read our post on the Massachusetts Notice To Quit: Don’t Be Dead On Arrival At Eviction Court

Going to Court

Starting an eviction requires the preparation and service of a Summary Process Summons and Complaint. You can choose to file your case in the local District Court or the Housing Court which is specialized to hear evictions. The Housing Court fees are less expensive, but can be busier. Some Housing Court judges have the reputation of being tenant or landlord friendly as well. Some would probably be happier retired and playing golf. It’s a tough job these days.

The summary process summons and complaint form is complicated to the layperson. It must be first served by a constable or sheriff on the tenant. Then, no less than 7 days after, it must be filed with the court by the “entry date,” which is always a Monday. The hearings are almost always on Thursday morning. Again, it’s best to have an experienced Massachusetts eviction attorney handle the legal paperwork.

Tenant Defenses and Counterclaims

Through the use of discovery requests, defenses and counterclaims, tenants in Massachusetts have ample legal means to delay and beat evictions. All tenants have a right to file “discovery” – formal requests for information and documents – from the landlord, which will automatically delay the hearing for two weeks. The tenant also may assert defenses and counterclaims against the landlord. These can range from improper notice or service, state Sanitary Code violations, no heat/hot water, failure to make repairs, retaliation, discrimination, and violations of the security deposit law—which carries triple damages and attorneys’ fees. (See my prior post on security deposits). Regardless of the merits of such claims, these defenses and counterclaims make the eviction process more complicated, time-consuming, and expensive.

Read my post on the Massachusetts State Sanitary Code — Everything A Landlord Wanted To Know But Was Afraid To Ask

Agreements for Judgment and Mediation

Eviction sessions are very busy. In some courts, there are over 100 cases stacked up on any one day and only one judge to hear them all. Accordingly, the courts will encourage parties to work out their differences on their own through mediation which is an informal sit-down between the parties to discuss ways to resolve the case. Some courts have housing specialists who can preside over the mediation session. Mediation is always non-binding so if no agreement can be reached you can proceed to a trial.

In the Housing Court, there are trained housing specialists who facilitate the mediation process. There are many advantages for landlords to mediation, and I almost always recommend giving it a try. The end result of a mediation is for the parties to sign an agreement for judgment. In a non-payment case, you can structure a payment plan and/or voluntary move-out. For a “cause” eviction, you can provide for a “last chance” agreement or move-out. The major benefit for landlords is that an agreement for judgment becomes a binding court order and the judge is supposed to enforce it upon proof of a violation. It also shows the judge that the landlord has been reasonable and accommodating. Experienced Massachusetts eviction attorneys will also make the tenants waive their rights to appeal and right to delay the case any further so as to avoid last minute requests for more time to vacate.

On the other hand, sometimes the situation is untenable and you have to go before the judge. Some judges hold a basic hearing, giving both sides the opportunity to speak. Some judges, particularly in the Housing Court, are more formal and require an actual trial with live witnesses and exhibits. I’ve had hearings last one minute and jury trials in eviction cases go on for days. But I’m always prepared to put on a case on for trial, as I always have my client present in court or on standby.

Appeals

Tenants in eviction cases do have a fairly robust right of appeal which can greatly delay resolution of the case. (A good reason in and of itself to do an agreement for judgment waiving appeal rights). However, in certain cases, the landlord can ask the court to impose an appeal bond so the tenant must pay rent into court to proceed with the appeal. Most tenants do not have the financial ability to do that, so that will terminate the appeal.

If you have any questions or need assistance with a Massachusetts summary process eviction, please contact me via email at [email protected] or by phone at 508-620-5352.

__________________________________

Richard D. Vetstein, Esq. is an experienced Massachusetts summary process & eviction attorney who has handled over 2,000 eviction cases all across Massachusetts. For help with a landlord tenant matter, please email him at [email protected] or call him at 508-620-5352.

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Mortgage Guy Brian Cav has been riding the Massachusetts mortgage rate roller coaster this week! Seems like the Fed’s new Quantitative Easing II policy has got the market jumping all over the place. Well, here’s the lowdown from BC:

Brian Cav

Wow, I am at a lack of words for what has happened over the past week with Mortgage Rates. Rates have changed up to 5 times per day since last Wednesday. We are just now starting to see some stabilization after a week of bad mortgage market losses.

Most Lenders are offering 4.25% with 1 point of origination for a 30 year fixed with standard costs. The same can be said at 3.75% for a 15 year fixed. You must have a 740 FICO credit score or better and enough equity in your home to refinance or standard down payment requirements on a purchase. Jumbo 30 year and 15 year fixed along with 5/1 ARMs are very near all-time lows as of today. Jumbo Mortgage financing requires a 80% loan to value or a 20% down payment on purchases.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates or guidelines at [email protected] 617.771.5021

Economic Data

Wednesday’s bond market has opened in positive territory following the release of favorable economic data and a relatively flat open in stocks. The stock markets don’t appear ready to rebound from yesterday’s selling with the Dow up and the Nasdaq up. The bond market is currently up 5/32, which with yesterday’s afternoon strength should improve this morning’s mortgage rates by approximately .25  of a discount point over yesterday’s morning pricing.

There were two reports posted this morning. The first was October’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) that showed weaker than expected inflation readings. The Labor Department said that the overall CPI reading rose 0.2% and that the core data was unchanged from September’s level. Both of these readings were just shy of forecasts, meaning inflationary pressures were not as strong at the consumer level of the economy as many had thought. That is good news for the bond market and mortgage rates, but did not come as too much of a surprise after yesterday’s PPI numbers.

The Commerce Department gave us today’s second piece of data. They announced that construction starts of new homes fell 11.7% last month, falling to their lowest level in the past year and a half. This is favorable data for the bond market and mortgage rates since it indicates housing sector weakness. Unfortunately, the data is not considered to be highly important, preventing it from influencing this morning’s mortgage rates by much.

The final monthly report of the week will come from the Conference Board late tomorrow morning when they release their Leading Economic Indicators (LEI) for October. This is a moderately important report that attempts to predict economic activity over the next three to six months. It is expected to show a 0.6% increase, meaning economic activity will rise fairly rapidly over the next couple of months. Generally speaking, this would be bad news for bonds. However, since this data is considered only moderately important, its results need to vary by a wide margin from forecasts for it to affect mortgage rates.

Also tomorrow, the Labor Department will give us last week’s unemployment figures. They are expected to announce that 442,000 new claims for unemployment benefits were filed last week. This would be an increase from the previous week and considered good news for the bond market. However, since this is only a week’s worth of new claims data, its impact on tomorrow’s mortgage rates will likely be minimal. The larger the number of new claims filed, the better the news for the bond market and rates.

FLOAT or  LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ FLOAT

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Home Buyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected] 617.771.5021

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We welcome for the first time, guest blogger Ricardo Brasil. Ricardo is a Vice President at one of America’s largest Banks, and is recognized as one of the top mortgage originators nationally. For more info, go to his website at www.ricardobrasil.com or call him directly at (617) 897-5192.

Ricardo Brasil

Quantitative Easing Policy I (QE I): The First Go-Around

Some feel there is a good chance that the FOMC’s planned announcement to purchase U.S. treasury bonds will cause mortgage rates to fall even further. Unlike the Fed’s first quantitative easing (QE I) program, however, borrowers could see a muted (or even negative) response by the time QE2 winds down next June when it comes to rates for home loans.

Mortgage rates improved substantially the last time the Fed carried out its first Quantitative Easing program from December 2008 through March 2010. $1.75 trillion in bonds and mortgage backed securities were purchased during that time and mortgage interest rates dropped by more than 1% over the same period for a 30-year fixed rate mortgage. In 2010 they have fallen further to just over 4% last week with no points.

Quantitative Easing Policy II (QE II): The Here & Now

There are those who argue the Fed’s second attempt at Quantitative Easing, known as QE2 or QEII, is different. Mortgage rates have the QE2 effect ‘baked into the cake’ according to many industry pundits. The goal of this type of Fed action is to lower real interest rates and increase spending in sectors that respond to interest rate changes. This includes home purchases as well as business spending and investment. Quantitative easing could decrease mortgage rates by increasing mortgage backed securities’ liquidity enough that the lower end MBS’s begin to sell. On the contrary, the purpose of quantitative easing ultimately is to stimulate the economy, and if it is successful, over time there should be real indicators of growth that show up in production and employment figure increases. These will surely put pressure on interest rates to rise.

Additionally, the direct impact on the economy of this quantitative easing policy will be a weakening of the US dollar. A weaker dollar in turn should make US products cheaper to foreign countries and cause exports to rise. With a weak dollar imported products of all kinds from clothes to consumer electronics will increase in price because it will take more dollars to buy the same amount of products. The increased cost of imports will drive up retail prices and increase inflation. As a result, inflation will cause home prices to rise and mortgage rates as well. This wouldn’t happen immediately but could be expected in the in the not too distant future. Moderate inflation and job growth are what the Fed is looking for.

Rising production of exported products should generate more profits for domestic companies and those profits should result in increased production and job growth. That in turn will lead to the stock market going up and for those in the mortgage industry who know this all too well, mortgage rates tend to follow the direction of the financial markets. Rates rise when the economy is clicking on all cylinders and equity markets are moving higher.  Rates decrease when the economy and equity markets struggle.

Float or Lock Down? Don’t Fight The Fed

As the cliché goes, don’t fight the Fed. Well, when it comes to mortgage rates, when we know the Fed is trying to stimulate the economy and put off dealing with inflation, I would do away with any floating bias and will be taking advantage of historically low rates for the time being without holding off for lower rates that we may not see.

Mortgage rates are currently hovering at record lows and remain very attractive especially in combination with low home prices. Although there will continue to be fractional fluctuations in rates over the next few months, mortgage rates should be low but range bound for the foreseeable future before being forced higher by inflationary pressures. After rates improved a bit following the Fed’s announcement they have gone up as recent economic news has been quite sanguine especially with the 151,000 jobs added in October. Mortgage bonds have fallen a whopping 143 basis points in the past 5 days and the yield on the 10yr-note has spiked 28 basis points higher.

Ricardo Brasil can be reached at www.ricardobrasil.com or call him directly at (617) 897-5192.

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Mortgage Guy, Brian Cav, is back with his Massachusetts weekly mortgage rate report.

Mortgage Rates hit new lows yesterday. If you have refinanced over the past 2 years there is a 70% chance you can refinance to 0.5% lower in rate and pay NO closing costs. The 30 year fixed mortgage rate has fallen down to the  4.25% to 4.375% range for well-qualified borrowers. Can you say high 3.875%,  30 year fixed rate paying points?!?!  These rates are amazing and may not be down this low again, I would take the safe play and LOCK in your purchase or refinancing application right now. Please call/email it only takes you 5 minutes to LOCK in at today’s new all-time low rates.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates or guidelines [email protected] 617.771.5021

Economic Data

Wednesday’s bond market has opened down sharply after this morning’s economic data showed surprising strength. The stock markets are heavily influencing bond trading with significant gains. Stocks have had quite a strong reaction to this morning’s news, pushing the Dow up over 230 points and the Nasdaq up. The bond market is currently down, which will likely push this morning’s mortgage rates higher by approximately .250 of a discount point. Strength in bonds late yesterday is helping to prevent a larger increase to this morning’s rates.

Today’s news came from the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), who released their manufacturing index for August late this morning. They announced a reading of 56.3 that was not only well above forecasts, but also an increase from July’s reading. This means that manufacturer sentiment about business conditions was much stronger than analysts had expected. When this happens, bonds tend to move lower and stocks higher as it is a sign of economic strength.

Yesterday afternoon’s release of the minutes from the last FOMC meeting didn’t reveal any significant surprises, but did indicate that the Fed is considering, or at least willing to invest more funds into mortgage-related securities. That can be considered good news for bonds and mortgage rates since the additional buying should drive mortgage pricing lower. However, it is just a thought at this time and cannot be given much weight until the Fed does decide to pursue that route.

There are two reports scheduled for release tomorrow morning that have the potential to influence rates. The first is the revised 2nd Quarter Productivity numbers, which measures employee productivity in the workplace. Strong levels of productivity allow the economy to expand without inflation concerns. It is expected to show a downward change from the previous estimate of a 0.9% decline. Forecasts are currently calling for a 1.7% drop, meaning productivity was weaker than previously thought. This would be negative news for the bond market and mortgage rates, but this data is not one of the more important reports we see each quarter. Therefore, unless there is a large variance from expectations, this report will likely have little impact on tomorrow’s rates.

July’s Factory Orders data will also be released tomorrow morning. This report measures manufacturing sector strength and is similar to last week’s Durable Goods Orders, but includes orders for both durable and non-durable goods. It is expected to show a 0.3% increase in new orders. A smaller than expected rise would be favorable for bonds, while a large than forecasted increase could lead to higher rates tomorrow morning.

Also worth noting are weekly unemployment figures that will be released by the Labor Department early tomorrow morning. They are expected to say that 475,000 new claims for unemployment benefits were filed last week. Since this data tracks only a single week’s worth of claims, it usually takes a fairly significant surprise for mortgage rates to react. This is especially true when monthly figures will be posted the following day, as is the case this week.

FLOAT or  LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ FLOAT

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Homebuyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected] 617.771.5021

Credit: Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, Mortgage News, MBS Quoteline, WSJ, NY Times

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Our Mortgage Guy, Brian Cav, is back with his Massachusetts weekly mortgage rate report.MA mortgage rates

Mortgage Rates are at all-time lows right now; 30 year fixed, 20 year fixed, 15 year fixed and even Jumbo Rates, and they are showing no signs of rising! I don’t see them going any lower but staying down at these levels for a while.  What’s moving Mortgage Rates? No one really knows right now but this is usually what happens, bonds go up, stocks go down.  Stocks go up, bonds go down. It’s really pretty easy to understand. However this mortgage market that we are in  is no where near normal.  In fact, it’s the total opposite, it’s like nothing we’ve ever experienced.

The housing market is stagnating at record low levels, refinance loans account for the majority of all present loan production.  Credit guidelines are as strict as they’ve ever been, it’s really brutal. Home values are off  by incredible amounts of  inventory. Mortgage Rates are showing no signs at all of rising anytime soon!

30 year fixed mortgage rates remain in the 4.375% to 4.625% range.  The 30 year fixed rate mortgage is 4.375% for a qualified borrower. 4.125% is presently being offered for two points.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates or guidelines [email protected] 617.771.5021

Economic Data

Wednesday’s bond market has opened in negative territory following modest stock gains. The Dow is currently up while the Nasdaq has gained. The bond market is currently down, which should push this morning’s mortgage rates higher by approximately .125 of a discount point.

There is no relevant economic data scheduled for release today. This leaves the stock markets to influence bond trading and mortgage rates. If the stock markets move higher from current levels, we should see bond prices fall and mortgage rates rise if the move is sizable. However, if the major stock indexes fall from where they are now, the bond market would likely improve, leading to slightly lower mortgage rates this afternoon.

The only relevant data scheduled for release tomorrow are weekly unemployment figures from the Labor Department. They will post the number of new claims for unemployment benefits filed last week, giving us a small measurement of employment sector growth. This data usually does not lead to noticeable changes in mortgage rates because the data tracks only a single week’s worth of new claims. Analysts are expecting 455,000 new claims, but it will likely take a fairly large variance for the markets to have much of a reaction to this data. This week’s release may carry a little more significance than usual because there is no other data scheduled for release that day.

Friday brings us the release of July’s Employment report that compiles several key employment readings and is based on an entire month’s worth of data. This is a very important report for the financial and mortgage markets and could lead to sizable changes to mortgage rates. I would not be surprised to see the traders prepare for the report by adjusting portfolios late tomorrow and Thursday. This could lead to some pressure in bonds or possibly improvements if market participants are betting on bad economic news coming. The results on mortgage rates should be fairly minimal and could easily be erased after the report is released Friday morning, but it is worth mentioning.

FLOAT or  LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ FLOAT

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Homebuyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected] 617.771.5021

Credit: Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, Mortgage News, MBS Quoteline, WSJ, NY Times

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Massachusetts Weekly Mortgage Rate Lock Advisory

by Rich Vetstein on July 28, 2010

Our Mortgage Guy, Brian Cav, is back with his Massachusetts weekly mortgage rate report. JUMBO is the name of the game this week.

I have never seen Jumbo Mortgage rates as low as they presently are right now. Absolutely everyone with a loan amount of $523,750 or greater (depends on county) should be reaching out to their Mortgage Banker for updated mortgage pricing, etc. The new home sales helped the stock market post strong gains yesterday, so when stocks advance, their gains come at the expense of higher interest rates. MBS prices are holding steady down near record highs and mortgage rates are holding steady near record lows. This is all I got this week…  absolutely everyone under this beautiful summer sun should at least be attempting to refinancing your current home loan.

The lowest 30 year fixed mortgage rates remain in the 4.25% to 4.625% range. The standard mortgage rate with closing costs is  still at 4.50%, 1 discount point of origination presently can get you 4.375% for qualified borrowers. Borrowers must have a mid FICO credit score of 740 or better and a loan to value of 80% or less.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates or guidelines [email protected] 617.771.5021

Economic Data

Wednesday’s bond market has opened relatively flat even though we saw weaker than expected results in this morning’s economic news and a negative open in stocks. The stock markets are posting minor losses with the Dow and nasdaq down. The bond market is currently up, which will likely improve this morning’s mortgage rates by approximately .125 of a discount point.

The Commerce Department gave us this morning’s important economic news with the release of June’s Durable Goods Orders. They announced a decline of 1.0% in new orders for big-ticket items when analysts were expecting to see a 0.7% increase. This data is known to be volatile from month to month, but this is still a sizable difference. Even if larger, more volatile transportation-related orders were excluded, we would have seen a drop of 0.6%. That was also well short of forecasts, indicating that the manufacturing sector may have been weaker than expected last month. Therefore, this data can be considered favorable for the bond market.

The Federal Reserve will release its Beige Book report at 2:00 PM ET this afternoon. This report is named simply after the color of its cover, but it is considered to be important to the Fed when determining monetary policy during their FOMC meetings. It details economic activity and conditions by region throughout the U.S. Since Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke’s testimony to Congress last week gave us a recent update, I don’t think we will see any significant surprises in this report. Therefore, we will likely see little movement in mortgage rates as a result of this report.

Also today is the first of this week’s two Treasury auctions that may influence mortgage rates. Today’s sale is the 5-year Note auction while tomorrow brings us the 7-year Note sale. Their results will be posted at 1:00 PM ET both days, so any reaction will come during afternoon hours. If investor interest was strong, the bond market may rally and mortgage rates could move lower later today. However, lackluster demand could lead to bond selling and higher mortgage rates.

There is no relevant monthly or quarterly economic data being posted tomorrow. The Labor Department will post weekly unemployment figures early tomorrow morning, but this data usually has a minimal impact on mortgage rates. Since it tracks only a week’s worth of new claims for unemployment benefits, it takes a large variance from forecasts for the bond market to react enough to influence mortgage pricing. Analysts are expecting to see little change from the previous week’s 464,000 new claims.

FLOAT or  LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ FLOAT

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Homebuyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected] 617.771.5021

Credit: Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, Mortgage News, MBS Quoteline, WSJ, NY Times

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Weekly Mortgage Rate Lock Advisory: July 7, 2010

by Rich Vetstein on July 7, 2010

Our Mortgage Guy, Brian Cav, is back from vacation with his Massachusetts weekly mortgage rate report. Interest rates are still hovering around historic lows.

Mortgage Market

Mortgage Rates are still at all-time lows and there is no real economic news due out this week to make any changes in the markets.  The MBA Applications, Weekly Jobless Claims, and Fridays Wholesale Trade should all have minimal to no impact on Mortgage rates this shortened week.  I hope everyone had a fun and safe Holiday weekend.

The conventional 30 year fixed mortgage rates remain in the 4.375% and 4.625% range for well qualified borrowers. To get the lowest possible mortgage  interest rate on a conventional loan you must have a credit score of 740 or higher, a loan to value at 80% or less and pay all closing costs including one point loan discount fee.  If you are seeking a 15 year term, you should expect those rates to be in the 3.875% to 4.125% range with similar costs.

Mortgage Rates are slightly higher than the all time lows set last week, but rates continue to hold near the best levels ever. I see very little to gain by floating so I continue to favor locking all loans closing in the next 30 days.  In my personal pipeline, I have even locked a few clients on 45 day commitments to remove the risk of volatility.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates or guidelines [email protected] 617.771.5021

Economic Data

Wednesday’s bond market has opened in negative ground with no relevant economic news scheduled for release and the stock markets showing early gains. The Dow is currently up while the Nasdaq has gained 25 points. The bond market is currently down 6/32, but I believe we will still see a slight improvement in this morning’s mortgage rates due to strength late yesterday.

The stock markets opened strong yesterday also, but actually fell into negative ground during the day before closing with respectable gains. If the major stock indexes repeat that cycle, particularly closing well below current levels, we may see improvements in bonds this afternoon. Since it is an especially light week with no relevant data being posted today, this could lead to a downward revision to mortgage rates this afternoon.

However, the flip side of that scenario is if stocks extend this morning’s gains rather than retreat from their current levels. If the major stock indexes move higher, bonds could move lower later today. This would likely lead to an upward revision to mortgage rates this afternoon, but would probably be a minor adjustment.

The Labor Department will post weekly unemployment figures early tomorrow morning. This release usually has little influence on bond trading or mortgage rates, but with a lack of important data scheduled for release this week it may draw more attention than usual. Analysts are expecting to see that approximately 460,000 new claims for benefits were filed last week. The higher the total of new claims, the better the news for bonds and mortgage rates.

FLOAT or  LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ FLOAT

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Homebuyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected] 617.771.5021

Credit: Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, Mortgage News, MBS Quoteline, WSJ, NY Times

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Our Mortgage Guy, Brian Cav, is back with his Massachusetts weekly mortgage rate report. With near record interest rate lows, his sage advice, again, is to LOCK IN!

Mortgage Refinancing BOOM! Mortgage Markets are officially at 2010 lows and, extremely close to 2009 lows. We are “near record low” rates, and this is going to be as good as it ever will be, I know, I know…  I sound like a broken record. The funny thing is rates are at all time lows and the Federal Reserve has stoppped buying mortgage backed securities a few months ago. U.S. housing  and the U.S. economy is the reason for record low mortgage rates, the past 4 months it has all been about economic issues in Europe. Mortgage rates will not go any lower, LOCK in your refinancing or purchase mortgage financing very soon, I know, I sound like a broken record.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates [email protected] 617.771.5021

Economic Data

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON UPDATE:  This week’s FOMC meeting has adjourned with no change to key short-term interest rates. This was widely expected and has not affected the markets or mortgage rates. The post-meeting statement did help influence opinions and bond trading. One of the points of interest was a comment that said the “economic recovery is proceeding” which differed slightly from the previous meeting that said economic activity continued to “strengthen.” Traders are taking that to mean the economic recovery is at a slower pace than previously thought.

The Fed indirectly indicated that concerns about Europe could affect that recovery, but said that they don’t expect that it to push the U.S. economy back into a recession. They also said that inflation remains subdued, which means there is no pressure to raise key rates anytime soon.

Overall, the lack of a change to rates has had no impact on the markets or mortgage rates, but the post-meeting statement was taken as favorable for the bond market. The lack of concern about inflation and the more cautious remarks on the status of our economic growth makes long-term securities such as mortgage-related bonds more attractive to investors.

The stock markets have changed little from their pre-announcement levels with the Dow up a couple of points and the Nasdaq still down a few points. The bond market is currently up, but I don’t think we will see a change to mortgage rates this afternoon since bonds had slipped slightly from morning highs before the 2:15 PM ET announcement. The bond market has improved slightly from its 2:15 PM level, but is still below where it was when rates were posted this morning.

May’s New Home Sales from the Commerce Department was today’s only relevant economic report. It revealed a whopping decline of 33% in sales of newly constructed homes, pushing sales levels down to record lows. This further indicates that the tax credits being offered to homebuyers were heavily supporting the housing market. That raises significant concerns about the growth ability of the housing sector now that they are expiring. This data is favorable news for the bond market and mortgage rates because a weakening housing sector will make a broader economic recovery more difficult and eases inflation concerns. Today’s data usually has little impact on trading and mortgage rates, but the size of decline has allowed the news to influence this morning’s rates.

The only important release scheduled for tomorrow is May’s Durable Goods Orders, which gives us an indication of manufacturing sector strength. It is known to be quite volatile from month to month and is expected to show a decline of 1.3% in new orders from April to May. A larger decline would be the ideal scenario for the bond market and could lead to a decline in mortgage pricing tomorrow.

FLOAT or  LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ LOCK

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Homebuyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected] 617.771.5021

Credit: Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, Mortgage News, MBS Quoteline, WSJ, NY Times

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Our Mortgage Guy, Brian Cav, is back with his Massachusetts weekly mortgage rate report, and his advice is to LOCK IN:

Brian Cav

The Stock Market is extending its gains and Mortgage Rates are starting to go up despite bad economical data coming from overseas. Yesterday afternoon we had a worsening pricing in Mortgage Markets because Greece had their credit rating cut by Moody’s to “junk.” Ouch. Floating your loan is very risky right now with investor optimism improving quickly. With the new Fannie Mae Loan Quality Initiative (eff. June 1st, 2010) please do not take out any new credit, extend any credit or have your credit pulled while applying for mortgage financing.  This is extremely important for all of those borrowers currently refinancing and looking to close June and July. Yes, you should be refinancing. The Massachusetts Mortgage Bankers Association says mortgage refinancing applications are up 21% the month of May.

The Conventional mortgage rate is still in the 4.625% to 4.875% range for well qualified borrowers. To get the best conventional mortgage pricing you must have a FICO score  of 740 or higher, and a 80% or less loan to value (1% discount point quoted with current rates).  The 15 year fixed conventional fixed mortgage is currently at all time lows.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Rates [email protected] 617.771.5021

FLOAT or  LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ LOCK


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Mortgage Guy Brian Cav has his weekly Massachusetts mortgage rate lock advisory. Brian and I were talking mortgages last night at the Boston Real Estate Now Blog first inaugural get together. The circular irony is that bad economic news = lower mortgage rates. But by the same token, bad economic news = less housing sales = less mortgage originations. An interesting Catch-22!

Mortgage pricing has gotten better over the past 24 to 48 hours, and the reason they have gotten better is non US related issues; Greece and economic uncertainty have kept US mortgage rates down over the past week. I would cautiously FLOAT over the next day or two and LOCK in before Friday’s unemployment numbers. Please try not to get to greedy on the beautiful Cinco De Mayo!

The 30 year conventional mortgage rate still remains in the 4.875% to 5.125% range for well qualified consumers. To secure a par interest rate on a conventional mortgage you must have a FICO credit score of 740 or higher, a loan to value at 80% or less and pay all closing costs including an estimated one point loan origination/discount. If you are seeking a 15 year term, you should expect par in the 4.25% to 4.50% range with similar costs but lower FICO score requirements.

Inquire within for current Mortgage Interest Rates. [email protected] 617.771.5021

Economic Data

Wednesday’s bond market opened in positive territory again following more weakness in stocks. The bond market is currently up, which should improve this morning’s mortgage rates by approximately .1250 – .25 in mortgage pricing..

There is no relevant data scheduled for release today, so any afternoon revisions to mortgage rates will likely come from movements in stocks. If the stock markets move into positive territory, we may see bonds fall and mortgage rates move higher. If the major stock indexes move lower, afternoon improvements to rates may follow.

The Labor Department will release its 1st Quarter Productivity and Costs data early tomorrow morning. This information helps us measure employee productivity in the workplace. If employee productivity is rapidly rising, the bond market should react favorably. It is expected to show a increase in productivity.

We also will get weekly unemployment figures from the Labor Department early tomorrow. They are expected to say that 440,000 new claims for unemployment benefits were filed last week. This would be a decline from the previous week, but unless we see a large variance from forecasts this data likely will not have much of an influence on tomorrow’s mortgage rates.

The big news of the week comes Friday when we will get April’s monthly employment numbers. They are expected to show that the unemployment rate stood at 9.7% last month and that 187,000 new jobs were added to the economy. The higher the unemployment rate and the fewer number of jobs added, the better the news for bonds and mortgage rates.

FLOAT or  LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – FLOAT/LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ FLOAT

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

  • Are you a possible Massachusetts First Time Homebuyer?
  • Do you have a Real Estate client inquiring about current Mortgage Rates?
  • Do you have any Refinancing questions?
  • Should you be thinking about Refinancing out of your ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage)?
  • Have your Real Estate clients been Pre Approved?

[email protected] 617.771.5021

Credit: Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, Mortgage News, MBS Quoteline, WSJ, NY Times

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I’m pleased to welcome mortgage professional Brian Cav, the creator of a great mortgage blog called Smarterborrowing.com. Brian was nice enough to give us his weekly mortgage rate report which I’m sure you’ll find interesting.

Mortgage Market

How did the FOMC meeting affect mortgage rates? Pricing actually got a bit better, both benchmark treasury yields and MBS prices improved after the FOMC statement was released. 30 year conventional mortgage rates are in the 4.75% to 5.125% for well qualified borrowers. If you are presently being quoted these mortgage rates and are closing in the next 15 to 45 days I like LOCKing these rates in. Could this small rally extend?

Economic Data

Yesterdays FOMC meeting has adjourned with an announcement of no change to key short-term interest rates. This was widely expected, but the post-meeting statement did cause some discussion. The Fed left the language in the recent statements that indicate that rates will remain near current levels for some time. This is good news for the bond market and mortgage rates as it means that the Fed is still concerned about an economic recovery.

There is little doubt that the Fed has to raise rates sometime in the future. The question is when. Some analysts feel that it has to be sooner than later to prevent other economic issues down the road. The ultimate goal is for the economy to gradually strengthen so Mr. Bernanke and company can slowly raise interest rates. Raising rates too soon could dampen economic activity by making borrowing more expensive for businesses and consumers. However, waiting too long to raise them could let inflation build momentum, leading to a rapid increase in key rates that also undermines economic growth.

Yesterday’s statement pretty much reiterated recent ones that hint the increases will be later than sooner. Some market analysts believe that is a mistake and that rates need to be raised this year. Others think the employment and housing sectors are still too weak to start raising rates. Who is correct? The future will show us, but in the meantime the debate will continue.

The bond and stock markets have improved from where they were before the statement was released. I would not be surprised to see a small downward revision to mortgage rates shortly as a result of the bond market strength. However, many lenders may opt to wait until tomorrow morning’s rates to reflect that improvement.

February’s Housing Starts was this morning’s only relevant economic data. The Commerce Department reported that construction starts of new homes fell 5.9% last month. This data is not considered to be greatly important to the markets or mortgage rates, so its impact on this week’s trading has been / will be minimal.

LOCK / FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 0 to 15 Days – LOCK/FLOAT

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 15 to 30 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 30 to 60 Days – LOCK

If I was closing on a Home Mortgage in the next 60+ FLOAT

This is only my opinion of what I would do if I were financing a home. It is only an opinion and cannot be guaranteed to be in the best interest of all/any other borrowers.

[email protected] 617.771.5021

Credit: Bloomberg, Yahoo Finance, Mortgage News, MBS Quoteline

Thanks Brian! Hopefully, you’re weekly report will be a regular feature here on the Blog.

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